fbpx

DIY Roof Repairs To Save A Buck… Hopefully

NOTE: We want to start this one off by saying, saving a few bucks to fix your own roof is not worth a trip to the hospital, the bill that comes with it, or potential permanent injury that could ensue. PLEASE be careful when climbing on your roof. Be sure the pitch is not too steep (anything under a 6:12 is pretty safe), and never get on a roof when it is wet. Our roofers have specialized shoes for certain types of roofs to help mitigate slipping and injuries. 

It is important to understand that roofing system failures of any kind come in varying degrees of decay. The DIY repairs listed below may not be an end-all seal of approval. Please know that some smaller issues could be indicators of much more extensive problems and that these minor fixes could only act as a temporary band-aid. We have heard of some quick fixes lasting for years, and some only for a couple of weeks. That is why it couldn’t hurt for you to call your local roofer to come out and have a look.

With that said, LET’S GET TO LEARNING!

Nail Pop

     Nail pops occur when a nail begins backing out of the roof and causes a bump under the shingle. This can happen due to weather causing expansion and contraction, or because a roofer used too small of a nail. 
 
Nail pops can be common, and when addressed swiftly, can be one of the easiest DIY fixes IF the nail has NOT punctured through the shingle that is covering it. 
 
If the nail has cracked or protruded through the covering shingle, then you now have a breach in your roofing system and could be susceptible to leaking (this, unfortunately, happens most of the time). If this is the case, then it would be a good time to call your local roofer to come out and have a look for repairs and recommendations to move forward. 
 
If you are unable to schedule a roofer before the next rain, then you can follow these quick DIY steps to put a temporary patch on the puncture to prevent any immediate damage. And if there is no puncture, then this could be an easy, quick fix for you lasting potentially years. 
 
To fix such a problem, you will need a couple of things: 
  • flat pry bar
  • hammer
  • some roofing nails (1 1/4″)
  • roofing sealant.
  1. Use your flat pry bar to lift GENTLY the shingle that is covering the popped nail. (Keep in mind that a properly installed shingle adheres to the underlying shingle at the base. So use the pry bar to detach that bond gently)

  2. Remove the nail, caulk the hole, and place a new nail along the nailing strip about 2 inches from the old hole. (The nailing strip, or “hot spot” is an area on a shingle specifically designed to receive a nail. It is usually shown as a darker line or by a colored line put there by the manufacturer)

  3. Place a generous line of sealant where the top shingle will lay on the shingle below. This is to re-seal that bond between the shingles so the wind does not get underneath it and cause wind damage. Lower the shingle back down, press firmly to create that bond, and you are good to go.

Wind-blown Shingles

     After a bad storm that brought hard winds, it is possible for some shingles to have been lifted. This can crease and crack your shingles, which can lead to leaking.
 
Honestly, there really isn’t an easy way to tackle this one as a DIYer. After a shingle has suffered wind damage, the shingles really just need to be replaced. Our first recommendation on this one would be to call your local roofer to have them come out to fix it.
 
But if the handyman gene “is strong in this one,” then here is how you do it. 
 
Here’s what you’ll need: 
  • flat pry bar
  • hammer
  • some roofing nails (1 1/4″)
  • roofing sealant
  • new shingle(s) that matches your current.
  1. Use your flat pry bar to lift GENTLY the shingle that is covering the damaged shingle. (Keep in mind that a properly installed shingle adheres to the underlying shingle at the base. So use the pry bar to detach that bond gently)

  2. Once you have worked loose the overlaying shingle, lift the shingle and begin to use your pry bar to pry up the nails holding down the damaged shingle. 

  3. Apply the same technique in steps one and two to the shingle above the damaged shingle. This is because a properly installed shingle is not only held in place by the nails in the nail strip nicknamed “the hot spot,” but is also nailed down at the very top by the shingle lying above it.

  4. Once the nails are removed from the damaged shingle and the shingle above it, you should now be able to wiggle free the damaged shingle. 

  5. Slide the new shingle into place and nail 5 nails along the “hot spot” (usually, this is a darker area or is identified by the manufacturer with a line).

  6. be sure you also re-nail the shingle above the new shingle. But do not place the nails back into the existing holes (an inch or two next to the old holes is fine).

  7. The new shingle will have an adhesive strip on the bottom backside of the shingle, which will adhere to the shingle below it. But the old shingle above the new shingle you just installed needs to be re-adhered. Take your sealant and run a line under the bottom side of the shingle and then press down to create the bond.

Shingle Slide

     This is when a shingle was not correctly nailed down, and the lower half of the shingle begins separating from the upper half.
 
You see, when shingles are installed, the roofer nails along a unique strip they call “the hot spot.” It is a relatively small strip (depending on the brand) that is specially designed to receive the nail.
 
If the installer does not hit that strip with the nail, then over time, as the shingle heats, the lower half of the shingle may begin separating from the upper half. 
 
Here’s What you’ll need: 
  • flat pry bar
  • hammer
  • some roofing nails (1 1/4″)
  • roofing sealant
  • preferably a new shingle that matches your current.
  1. Use your flat pry bar to lift GENTLY the shingle that is above the sliding shingle. (Keep in mind that a properly installed shingle adheres to the underlying shingle at the base. So use the pry bar to detach that bond gently)

  2. Once you have worked loose the overlaying shingle, lift the shingle and begin to use your pry bar to pry up any remaining nails holding down the damaged shingle. 

  3. Apply the same technique in steps one and two to the shingle above the damaged shingle. This is because a properly installed shingle is not only held in place by the nails in the nail strip nicknamed “the hot spot,” but is also nailed down at the very top by the shingle lying above it.

  4. If you don’t have a new shingle, then rearrange the sliding shingle to align with the other secured shingles. Otherwise, align your new shingle with the secure shingles.

  5. Find the “hot spot” on the shingle. This is a darkened line of tar. Depending on how old your shingles are, and the quality of the shingle will determine if this line is easy to find or faded.

  6. Hammer a few nails along the “hot spot” to secure the shingle (5 should do it).

  7. Place a generous line of sealant where the top shingle will lay on the shingle below. This is to re-seal that bond between the shingles so the wind does not get underneath it and cause wind damage. Lower the shingle back down, press firmly to create that bond, and you are done.

Plumbing Boots (roof jack flashing)

     So this repair has quite a few steps, and we are working on making a step by step video for you guys with this one. Stick around and we will have that linked here for your DIY Roof Repair needs.

Flashing

     Roof flashing issues are just one of those things you call the professionals for. While possible to write down step-by-step instructions, there are just some things experience can solve that DIY YouTube videos or articles can’t.

Drip Edge

     Believe it or not, as simple as a drip edge may look, it falls under the flashing category and can be equally as challenging to repair. This is another one of those issues we recommend calling your local roofer to get the job done right.

HOW CAN WE HELP?

Roofs restored's Louisiana License